Monday, July 29, 2019

Why become a Certified Java Programmer? Does Oracle Certified Professional Earn more?

I have seen many Java programmers in doubt whether to go for Java certifications or not? Whether getting Java certified will help them to earn a better salary? or after becoming Java certified from Oracle will help them to get a Job. In this article, we will see what the benefits of getting Java certified are. I know higher income, better job prospects, and a better chance of promotion is at the top of the benefits of becoming a certified Java professional, but this certification provides much more value than that. Apart from all those tangible benefits, the most important thing is that you learn Java better, which help you everywhere like in your day job as well as on interviews.

Thursday, July 18, 2019

Top 10 Java 11 Certification Mock Tests and Practice Tests [4 Free OCPJP 11 Sample Questions]

The latest Java certification is now out, the Java 11 Certification. Ever since Java 9 and Java10 were out, programmers were speculating that what will happen to Java certification now? Will, there is, be a new Java 9 certification or Java 10 certification? Will there be a new Java certification every 6 months, following the Java SE release cycle? Well, Thankfully, nothing of that sort happened; a new Java certification every six months would have been a crazy idea, not just for students and programmers but also to all the parties involved, including Oracle itself.  Now the big question is what has been changed in Java 11 certification, and should you go for OCAJP 8 or OCAJP 11 certification?

Saturday, July 13, 2019

Bucket Sort in Java with Example - How Algorithm Works

In recent years, one of the questions I have increasingly seen in programming job interviews is about constant time sorting algorithms like do you know any O(n) sorting algorithm? how do they work? When I first encountered this question, I had no idea whether we can sort in constant time because even some of the fastest sorting algorithms like QuickSort or MergeSort takes O(N log N) time for sorting on their average case. After some research, mainly by going through the classic CLRS book and this DS and Algorithms course by Tim Buchalka and Goran Lochert on Udemy, I come to know that there indeed are some constant time or linear time sorting algorithms like bucket sort, counting sort, and radix sort, which can sort an array in O(n) time but they work with only a special set of input.