How to update an entity using Spring Data JPA ? Example Tutorial

Hello Java programmers and Spring Boto developers, if you are wondering how to update an entity using Spring Data JPA and looking for a tutorial or example then you have come to the right place. Earlier, I have shared the best Spring Data JPA Courses and in this article, I will show you how you can update any entry using Spring Data JPA. How to update an entity using spring-data-JPA is also a  must-know topic when it comes to spring application development. Query methods are supported by Spring for updating operations. Entities are typically modified with Hibernate by retrieving them from the database, changing specific fields, and persisting the entities.

You can modify or update the entities by defining the repository method using @Query and @Modifying annotations. All the update/delete operations are based on the transaction scope.

Let's have an example to discuss this further by having a real-world example. First, update the pom.xml file with the following dependencies.


1. pom.xml

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<project xmlns="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0" 
xmlns:xsi="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema-instance" 
xsi:schemaLocation="http://maven.apache.org/POM/4.0.0 
https://maven.apache.org/xsd/maven-4.0.0.xsd">
   <modelVersion>4.0.0</modelVersion>
   <parent>
      <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
      <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-parent</artifactId>
      <version>2.5.0</version>
      <relativePath />
      <!-- lookup parent from repository -->
   </parent>
   <groupId>com.codexlabs</groupId>
   <artifactId>spring-cloud-config-server</artifactId>
   <version>0.0.1-SNAPSHOT</version>
   <name>spring-database-server</name>
   <description>Demo project for Spring Boot</description>
   <properties>
      <java.version>11</java.version>
      <spring-cloud.version>2020.0.3</spring-cloud.version>
   </properties>
   <dependencies>
      <dependency>
         <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
         <artifactId>spring-boot-starter-data-jpa</artifactId>
      </dependency>
      <dependency>
         <groupId>com.h2database</groupId>
         <artifactId>h2</artifactId>
      </dependency>
   </dependencies>
   <build>
      <plugins>
         <plugin>
            <groupId>org.springframework.boot</groupId>
            <artifactId>spring-boot-maven-plugin</artifactId>
         </plugin>
      </plugins>
   </build>
</project>
 
 




2. Application. Properties

Then update the application.properties file with the following h2 database properties.

server.port=8080 
spring.h2.console.enabled=true 
spring.h2.console.path=/h2-console 
spring.datasource.url=jdbc:h2:mem:cmpe172 
spring.datasource.driverClassName=org.h2.Driver 
spring.datasource.username=sa 
spring.datasource.password= root
spring.jpa.database-platform=org.hibernate.dialect.H2Dialect


3. Model Class

After configuring these details in the application.properties file, create your first model
class Card with the following details.
import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.GeneratedValue;
import javax.persistence.GenerationType;
import javax.persistence.Id;
import javax.persistence.Table;
 
@Entity
@Table(name = "CARD")
public class Card {
    @Column(name = "id")
    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.AUTO)
    private int id;
 
    @Column(name = "cardNumber")
    private String cardNumber;
 
    @Column(name = "cardCode")
    private int cardCode;
 
    @Column(name = "balance")
    private double balance;
 
    @Column(name = "activated")
    private boolean activated;
 
    @Column(name = "status")
    private String status;
 
    public String getCardNumber() {
        return cardNumber;
    }
 
    public void setCardNumber(String cardNumber) {
        this.cardNumber = cardNumber;
    }
 
    public int getCardCode() {
        return cardCode;
    }
 
    public void setCardCode(int cardCode) {
        this.cardCode = cardCode;
    }
 
    public double getBalance() {
        return balance;
    }
 
    public void setBalance(double balance) {
        this.balance = balance;
    }
 
    public boolean isActivated() {
        return activated;
    }
 
    public void setActivated(boolean activated) {
        this.activated = activated;
    }
 
    public String getStatus() {
        return status;
    }
 
    public void setStatus(String status) {
        this.status = status;
    }
 
    public int getId() {
        return id;
    }
 
    public void setId(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }
}




4. Repository interface

The next step is to define the CardRepository interface. We can define it as below.
import org.springframework.data.jpa.repository.JpaRepository;
public interface CardRepository extends JpaRepository < Card, Integer > {
 
    Card findBycardNumber(String cardNumber);
    Card findBycardNumberAndCardCode(String cardNumber, int cardCode);
    @Transactional
    @Modifying
    @Query("update CARD c set c.balance = ?1 where c.cardNumber = ?2")
    int updateCardBalance(double balance, String cardNumber);
 
    @Transactional
    @Modifying
    @Query("update CARD c set c.balance = c.balance-5")
    int reduceCardBalanceByFive();
}




5. Testing

After that, we can test this application using Main.java, and it will help to understand
how the update an entity using spring-data-jpa is going on. 

Here, I didn't import the classes to the main method, and in your application, please import those files; otherwise will not work.

import java.util.Arrays;
 
import org.springframework.boot.CommandLineRunner;
import org.springframework.boot.SpringApplication;
import org.springframework.boot.autoconfigure.SpringBootApplication;
import org.springframework.context.annotation.Bean;
 
 
@SpringBootApplication
public class App {
 
    public static void main(String args[]) {
        SpringApplication.run(App.class, args);
    }
 
    public void printCards(Iterable < Card > cards, String msg) {
        for (Card card: cards) {
            System.out.println(card);
        }
 
        System.out.println();
    }
 
    @Column(name = "cardNumber")
    private String cardNumber;
 
    @Column(name = "cardCode")
    private int cardCode;
 
    @Column(name = "balance")
    private double balance;
 
    @Column(name = "activated")
    private boolean activated;
 
    @Column(name = "status")
    private String status;
 
    @Bean
    public CommandLineRunner demo(CardRepository cardRepository) {
        return (args) - > {
            Card card1 = Card.builder()
                             .cardNumber("1000200010")
                             .cardCode("BE001")
                             .balance(1200)
                             .activated(true)
                             .status("processing")
                             .build();

            Card card2 = Card.builder()
                             .cardNumber("1000200011")
                             .cardCode("BE002").balance(2300)
                             .activated(true).status("processing").build();
            Card card3 = Card.builder()
                             .cardNumber("1000200012")
                             .cardCode("BE002").balance(3555)
                             .activated(true).status("processing").build();
            Card card4 = Card.builder()
                             .cardNumber("1000200013")
                             .cardCode("BE001").balance(4945)
                             .activated(true).status("processing").build();
            Card card5 = Card.builder()
                             .cardNumber("1000200014")
                             .cardCode("BE001").balance(523).activated(true)
                             .status("processing").build();
 
            cardRepository.save(card1);
            cardRepository.save(card2);
            cardRepository.save(card3);
            cardRepository.save(card4);
            cardRepository.save(card5);
 
            List < Card > cards = cardRepository.findAll();
            printCards(cards, "All the card information");
 
            int updatedRecords 
             = cardRepository.updateCardBalance(24000, "1000200010");
 
            if (updatedRecords == 1) {
                Card card = cardRepository.findBycardNumber("1000200010").get();
                printCards(Arrays.asList(card), 
                      "Card detailas with the relevant card number");
            } else {
                System.out.println("Failed to update");
            }
 
            updatedRecords = cardRepository.reduceCardBalanceByFive();
            System.out.println("Total updated record : " + updatedRecords);
 
            cards = cardRepository.findAll();
            printCards(cards, "All the card informations ");
        };
    }
 
}




6. Output

After running the above application on your local machine, the following output will be generated
on your console.

All the card information 
Card [id=1, cardNumber=1000200010, cardCode=BE001,
 balance=1200, activated=true,
 status=processing] 
Card [id=2, cardNumber=1000200011, cardCode=BE002, 
 balance=2300, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=3, cardNumber=1000200012, cardCode=BE002, 
 balance=3555, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=4, cardNumber=1000200013, cardCode=BE001, 
 balance=4945, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=5, cardNumber=1000200014, cardCode=BE001,
 balance=523, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 

Card detailas with the relevant card number 
Card [id=1, cardNumber=1000200010, cardCode=BE001, 
 balance=1200, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 

Total updated record : 5 
All the card informations 
Card [id=1, cardNumber=1000200010, cardCode=BE001, 
 balance=1195, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=2, cardNumber=1000200011, cardCode=BE002, 
 balance=2295, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=3, cardNumber=1000200012, cardCode=BE002,
 balance=3550, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=4, cardNumber=1000200013, cardCode=BE001, 
 balance=4940, activated=true, 
 status=processing] 
Card [id=5, cardNumber=1000200014, cardCode=BE001, 
 balance=518, activated=true, 
 status=processing]

So the h2 databases records are updated with the updated queries. You can see that from the above output.

7. Summary 

1. When building a JPQL query to alter records, we use the modifying annotation (create, update, delete)

2. When writing a query for modification, JPQL always returns either void or integer.

3. When writing JPQL queries, we use the @Transactional annotation from the
org.springframework.transaction.annotation.Transactional package.


How to update an entity using Spring Data JPA ? Example Tutorial



That's all about how to update an entry using Spring Data JPA. It's not that difficult, and once you do a couple of examples, you can easily do this. So hope you understand how to update an entity using spring-data-jpa with the above explanation and code segments. 

Will see you in the next tutorial. till then you can check out our earlier tutorials and resources as shown below.

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Thanks for reading this article so far. If you find this Spring Data JPA Tutorial and Example, then please share it with your friends and colleagues. If you have any questions or feedback, then please drop a note.

P. S. - If you are a beginner and want to learn the Framework from scratch and look for some of the best online resources, you can also check out these best Spring MVC courses for beginners. This list contains free Udemy and Pluralsight courses to learn Spring MVC from scratch.     
   

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